Thursday, August 13, 2020

Ankhesenamun – Ancient Egypt’s Lost Princess: Tragic Forgotten Wife of the Boy Pharaoh, Tutankhamen

If it wasn't for the discovery of Tutankhamen’s all-but-intact tomb, this king of relatively small importance would have remained in obscurity. Had their tombs...

Abu Simbel’s History: The Great Temples of Ramesses II

Located on the west bank of the Nile south of Aswan, in what used to be Nubia, the temples of Abu Simbel were completely...

Sneferu, King in 4th Dynasty Egypt: The Benevolent Pyramid Builder

Sneferu was so amiable he offered to replace a turquoise charm lost in the river by a palace lady. But he took prisoners and...

Pepy I Meryre, King of Egypt: Survivor of a Queen’s Conspiracy and Named a...

Pepy is said by Flinders Petrie to have left more monuments, large and small, than any other ruler before the Middle Kingdom. He built...

Egyptian Artisans Strike: First Recorded Labor Strike in History

The workmen who built the tombs of the New Kingdom Kings and Queens, were not ordinary laborers. Some, like Sennedjem, had their own tombs...

From Papyrus to Paper

Papyrus is an Egyptian water plant that has enabled man to preserve from oblivion the records of dynasties long since passed into history. The...

Cleopatra’s Children and Descendants

The Egyptian queen bore Julius Caesar an illegitimate son in 47 BC, appropriately naming him Caesarion to demonstrate his relationship to Caesar. The boy...

Cleopatra’s Family: The Ptolemies

Afro-centrists illustrate that Cleopatra - who ruled as Cleopatra VII, was black - largely basing their opinion on the fact that she was African...

Nesyamun, the Leeds Mummy: Egyptian Priest of Amun at Karnak

Nesyamun (previously known as Natsef-Amun) is an Egyptian mummy from around 1100 BC, currently held in Leeds City Museum. He arrived in the museum...

Akhenaten and Nefertiti’s Children

Pharaoh Akhenaten had six daughters by his chief wife Nefertiti, he married the elder two and the younger four died unexpectedly. Meritaten Their eldest child was...