Friday, October 30, 2020

Ancient British History

Welcome to the fascinating and mist-shrouded world of Ancient British History. The historian’s task is frustrating but exhilarating, deciphering old manuscripts, exploring Roman ruins, and following the trail of the elusive King Arthur. All these things are found herein–the columns explore Britain from the Bronze Age to the Norman Conquest. Come on and in and enjoy!

What the Romans Left Behind: The Aqueducts

One of the chief challenges of the Roman Empire was how to provide for the continued extravagant lifestyles of the rich and famous in...

In Most of Arthurian Lore, Women Get a Bad Rap

The traditional treatment of women in the Arthurian saga is interesting to note in its severity. Guinevere is an adulteress, Morgan Le Fay is...

Christianity in Kent: Not Exactly an Inquisition

Augustine (not the famous one but a namesake) arrived in Kent in 597. He and 30 other monks were sent by Pope Gregory I...

Ethelbert and the Code of Laws

Ethelbert of Kent was the third overlord of Saxon England, following Aelle of Sussex and Ceawlin of Wessex. He held power at the turn...

Saxons on Horseback? Why Not?

Why didn’t the Saxons fight on horseback? Some of them were trained in Roman legions, so they must have known how. It’s a mystery...

The Weapons of War in Anglo-Saxon England

War was a way of life to the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes who invaded and settled in Britain. They were fleeing the encroaching Romans,...

Anglo-Saxon Infighting: Everyone Wants to Be King

In the last article, the focus was on the settlement and leaders of the various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. Much of this information is verifiable from...

The Heptarchy: Anglo-Saxon Ascendancy

Let us take a step back from religious fervor for a moment and focus on the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms themselves. The Heptarchy: Anglo-Saxon Ascendancy The first...

The Synod of Whitby: Turning Point for Christian Britain

The Christianization of Saxon lands was rolling right along in the early 7th century. Kent was the first to convert; then came Essex and...

Patrick and Columba: The Beginnings of Celtic Christianity

The names of Patrick and Columba are giants in the study of the spread of Christianity in Britain. Patrick it was who came to Ireland...